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In Defense of Christian Hungary
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 272

In Defense of Christian Hungary

In this important historical account of the role that religion played in defining the political life of a modern national society, Paul A. Hanebrink shows how Hungarian nationalists redefined Hungary—a liberal society in the nineteenth century—as a narrowly "Christian" nation in the aftermath of World War I. Drawing on impressive archival research, Hanebrink uncovers how political and religious leaders demanded that "Christian values" influence public life while insisting that religion should never be reduced to the status of a simple nationalist symbol. In Defense of Christian Hungary also explores the emergence of the idea that a destructive "Jewish spirit" was the national enemy. In c...

A Specter Haunting Europe
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 352

A Specter Haunting Europe

In the 20th century, Europe was haunted by a specter of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. Fear of a Jewish Bolshevik plot to destroy the nations of Europe took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across the continent. Paul Hanebrink shows that the myth of ethno-religious threat is still alive today, in Westerners’ fear of Muslims.

A Specter Haunting Europe
  • Language: en

A Specter Haunting Europe

  • Type: Book
  • -
  • Published: 2018
  • -
  • Publisher: Unknown

In the 20th century, Europe was haunted by a specter of its own imagining: Judeo-Bolshevism. Fear of a Jewish Bolshevik plot to destroy the nations of Europe took hold during the Russian Revolution and spread across the continent. Paul Hanebrink shows that the myth of ethno-religious threat is still alive today, in Westerners' fear of Muslims.--

Constructing Nationalities in East Central Europe
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 293

Constructing Nationalities in East Central Europe

The hundred years between the revolutions of 1848 and the population transfers of the mid-twentieth century saw the nationalization of culturally complex societies in East Central Europe. This fact has variously been explained in terms of modernization, state building and nation-building theories, each of which treats the process of nationalization as something inexorable, a necessary component of modernity. Although more recently social scientists gesture to the contingencies that may shape these larger developments, this structural approach makes scholars far less attentive to the "hard work" (ideological, political, social) undertaken by individuals and groups at every level of society wh...

The Monumental Nation
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 300

The Monumental Nation

From the 1860s onward, Habsburg Hungary attempted a massive project of cultural assimilation to impose a unified national identity on its diverse populations. In one of the more quixotic episodes in this "Magyarization," large monuments were erected near small towns commemorating the medieval conquest of the Carpathian Basin-supposedly, the moment when the Hungarian nation was born. This exactingly researched study recounts the troubled history of this plan, which-far from cultivating national pride-provoked resistance and even hostility among provincial Hungarians. Author Bálint Varga thus reframes the narrative of nineteenth-century nationalism, demonstrating the complex relationship between local and national memories.

Bringing the Dark Past to Light
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 736

Bringing the Dark Past to Light

Despite the Holocaust’s profound impact on the history of Eastern Europe, the communist regimes successfully repressed public discourse about and memory of this tragedy. Since the collapse of communism in 1989, however, this has changed. Not only has a wealth of archival sources become available, but there have also been oral history projects and interviews recording the testimonies of eyewitnesses who experienced the Holocaust as children and young adults. Recent political, social, and cultural developments have facilitated a more nuanced and complex understanding of the continuities and discontinuities in representations of the Holocaust. People are beginning to realize the significant r...

The Workers State
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 400

The Workers State

"In 1956, Hungarian workers joined students on the streets to protest years of wage and benefit cuts enacted by the Communist regime. Although quickly suppressed by Soviet forces, the uprising led to changes in party leadership and conciliatory measures that would influence labor politics for the next thirty years. In The Workers' State, Mark Pittaway presents a groundbreaking study of the complexities of the Hungarian working class, its relationship to the Communist Party, and its major political role during the foundational period of socialism (1944-1958). Through case studies of three industrial centers--Újpest, Tatabánya, and Zala County--Pittaway analyzes the dynamics of gender, class...

Christianity and Modernity in Eastern Europe
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 386

Christianity and Modernity in Eastern Europe

Disgraceful collusion. Heroic resistance. Suppression of faith. Perseverance of convictions. The story of Christianity in twentieth-century Eastern Europe is often told in stark scenes of tragedy and triumph. Overlooked in the retelling of these dramas is how the region's clergy and lay believers lived their faith, acted within religious and political institutions, and adapted their traditions---while struggling to make sense of a changing world. The contributors to this volume, coming from the U.S. and Western and Eastern Europe, look beyond the narratives of resistance and collaboration. They offer surprising new evidence from archives and oral history interviews, and they provide fresh in...

Shards of War
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 246

Shards of War

On June 24, 1941, Michael, 16, and his sister, 19, leave their home in Dubno in Ukraine, just ahead of the advancing German armies. Fleeing by foot and train, deep into Ukraine and beyond, the teens spend a brutal winter in a town near Stalingrad, where they nearly perish from hunger and cold. In July of 1942, they escape again ahead of the Germans onslaught. The siblings saga of loss, courage, and endurance is interlaced with accounts of critical events of the war and of the annihilation of the Jews in Ukraine, offering an important historical narrative of the challenges wartime refugees faced in the Soviet Union. "Its very well-written and tells an extraordinary story with much passion, em...

Pan-Germanism and the Austrofascist State, 1933-38
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 259

Pan-Germanism and the Austrofascist State, 1933-38

This book is about the ideas and policies that characterised the rightward trajectory of Austrofascism in the 1930s. It is the first major Anglophone study of Austrofascism in over two decades and provides a fresh perspective on the debate over whether Austria was an authoritarian or fascist state. The book is designed to introduce specialists, general scholars of fascism, and undergraduate students of interwar Austrian and Central European history, to the range of issues confronting Austrian policy and opinion makers in the years prior to the Anschluss with Nazi Germany. The book makes an original contribution to studies of interwar Austria by introducing several new case studies, including press and propaganda, minority politics, regionalism, immigration and refugees, as the issues that shaped Austria's political culture in the 1930s. Its arguments and findings will be of value for scholars as well as students of interwar fascism and twentieth-century Austrian and Central European history.